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20121207
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between national security and education. speakers included former secretary of state condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public-school, joel klein, hosted by the foundation for excellence and education. this is about an hour. >> welcome to this evening's bought test of morning joe. [laughter] the energy in this room is nice. how this issue of educational reform has ripened, the combination of need, the talent we see in this room. there is a sense that the moment has a ride. the other is jeb bush. i am a great believer that two things matter in life -- ideas and people. that is the driver of change in history. jeb is a perfect example of in what he is doing. he is the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. the fact that you are here is the greatest salute you could give. condie and that, the the national security background. we used to mess around with something called the rand bond calculated. it used to calculate the cep, t he circular error robert roe -- error probable. are today. we have travelled a considerable distance. when asked what the gre
graduate from our university. why should we educate some of the best minds on earth and say sorry, no room in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same problem that the stem bill in september had. it holds visa from a legal immigration program that works over to a
, and i want to give our children the kind of education they need. i want to lead the world in research, technology, and clean energy. i want to put people back to work rebuilding our roads, bridges, and our schools. i want to do this by bringing down our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. [applause] we have important decisions to make. our ultimate goal is to get our long-term deficits under control in a way that is balanced and fair, and that will be good for businesses, for future generations. i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we will have to raise more revenue, cut out spending we do not need, building on the spending cuts we have already made, and if we combine those two things, which can create a path where america is paying its bills while being able to make investments in things we need to do like grow infrastructure. we know how to do it, but in washington nothing is easy, so there is kind to be some prolonged negotiations. all of us will have to get out of our company's films to make tha
people in the room and i am proud of the will of my law school in educating people like he weifang and other chinese scholars over the past three decades. we need to be as clear eyed as possible. historically, chinese reformers and some of their foreign friends have taken too unnuanced a view. this has made reform in china more complicated. the progress we have made is not inevitable, but often the result of hard-fought battles. it is helpful to underscore how even today it is a challenge to maintain the rule of law. law, by its nature, is dynamic. society changes and requires constant vigilance. i cannot resist one anecdote. the dean of one of the great chinese law schools was visiting me in boston a decade ago. we went to dinner and he said, can i ask you something personal? i said, of course. he said, this is a private, intimate question. i was trying to figure out is this salary, is the religion, is it politics? he leans across the table and says, professor, the separation of powers business -- you don't really believe it, do you? [laughter] he was amazed when i told him it was
1 in 80 a member of the incidents cited by the cdc will realize win over educated and under or unemployed adults are brought into the welfare or this is not only an unnecessary but also critically unfair to a large group of people in our society. to prevent the scenario, changes must begin now. mercyhurst is dedicated to preparing ala graduates for productive careers. we have tried to develop partnerships and have with the verizon foundation, and other private donors. the next up for the aim program is to fund and launch the end ship program for seniors and provide -- internship program for seniors and provide programs that prepare them for the workplace. the program has been cited as a model program and has implemented a majority of the innovative components of the program with limited resources and opportunities beyond the commitment of university. is our hope is strong consideration is made for allocations of government resources to fund programs like the initiative at mercyhurst which assist students not only in achieving a college education, but help them to become prod
for college education as well. >> dealing with the mortgage interest deduction would hurt the middle class. >> if you take it in isolation. it depends how you balance it off. the rubric for us is, in has to be balanced. it has to be fair. it has to be comprehensive. it should be on the table to be discussed. we do not think that randomly you can pick things out, without understanding the unintended consequences that would provide. >> on the mortgage interest deduction -- i have a bill setting out there, trying to garner some republican support, that takes away the mortgage interest deduction for yachts that count as second homes. mr. larsen is talking about a schoolteacher trying to make sure it is affordable to buy a home, while there is a mortgage interest deduction available to people who buy yachts. that is coming from the person who represents the land of 10,000 lakes. i do not see a yacht in minnesota. that is the type of reform we are talking about. instead of signing on for that, they come to the middle class. that is where the frustration and fairness lies. >> we have heard from y
with one purpose in mind -- to educate citizens, community groups and policymakers about the positive impacts of choosing locally owned businesses. it is a network of locally owned independent businesses, community organizations and citizens that's grown to more than 3,000 local business owners. studies have shown that shifting just a small percentage of our shopping dollars to locally owned businesses could keep millions in our communities. this is something to think about as the holiday season approaches. instead of going to a chain, why not branch out and get your coffee at safari cafe on south port or get a hotdog at jean and june's and buy a few holiday gift at a local shop as well? local businesses help thriving communities. i'm glad to have local first chicago fighting for ours. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is rec
the national education system. this is the only way you can invest in syrians. this is why syria has to have a long-term plan to recover. syria needs at least $60 billion to recover. with all the destruction that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen next, that is an issue that the new syrian position should address. >> the rights of the minorities is an important issue. sometimes we emphasize the issues from their own perspective. when the syrian uprising started, christians, alliance, and christians being killed by participating. he decided to go back to his hometown. he is from damascus, but he is playing a role by training journalist to do the video to
grow jobs, but we can decrease foreign competition. it makes no sense to educate the world's best and brightest and require them to go home and be our competition. we do not win in that case. the way we when is we keep the best and brightest here, american and foreign, and we grow opportunity and create jobs. this is a great step. this is the first piece of reforming immigration. this is the first piece of -- it is immigration and economic opportunity in one step. i was glad to see people from the other side of the aisle step over and support it. >> what was your reaction to what the president said yesterday. >> that is not a serious offer. they are asking for $1.60 trillion in tax hikes. nowhere near that number in spending reform. we have always said we want to fix the problem. we want to make sure we get a hand on the unfunded obligations. we want to stop the spending problem so we can fix the deficit. we want to get people back to work, which is why again, we take the position that raising tax rates is absolutely not something that helps get people back to work. >> what was th
the wealthiest americans to pay a little more so we can still invest in things like education and training in science and research. i know some of this may sound familiar to you. we talked a lot about this during the campaign. this should not be a surprise to anybody. this was a major debate in the presidential campaign and congressional campaigns across the country. a clear majority of americans -- not just democrats, but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents, agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that does not hurt the economy and middle-class families. i am glad to see you have been reading the papers lately -- more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea we should have a balanced approach. both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle-class families. let's begin our work with what we agree. the senate has passed a bill that keeps income-tax is from going up on the middle-class families. democrats in the house are willing to vote for that same bill today. if we can get a few house republicans to agree as well, i
education, keep in mind, not everybody wants to stay here as attractive as our country is, some people want to learn here and go back to other countries thansd fine as well. but many will want to stay here. in losing some of those visas, again, we are only increasing the immigration problem, the legal immigration problem and moving in the opposite direction addressing immigration in this country. there is little to be proud of with regard to the current state of affairs in immigration. it's very different than when my grandparents came here and came to ellis island and albeit with a misspelled name were able to go to work the next day. it's becoming harder and harter. the absence of a legal way of immigrants that's in touch with our labor market in this country, the lack of having an ore rahtive immigration system, has led to 10 million people being here illegally, working here illegally, in many cases integrated into our communities, many of them have american children. yet without any way, currently, of getting right with the law. what we need to do in immigration reform is require that p
citizens, every stripe you can imagine, we have had a chance to talk to. we have had a chance to educate a lot of people about what the real problem is. i think you are right. there has been no punishment. i think people are ahead of politicians. that often happens. if they appreciate anything about what al and i have done, it is that we have been honest with them. there is no easy way out. they ask us what we need to cut and we were very specific. the defense department has to be there. we have been very specific about reforming the entitlement programs and making the real cuts. not cuts for things dick durbin would say. there are things he hated worse than the devil. we were candid about the tax code. at the end of every time we talk, without exception, we get a standing ovation. they are desperate for somebody to tell them the truth. that and other things other people have done are beginning to have a real effect. the politicians who think they can get away with ducking the issue or taking a pass. >> follow up on your one-third comment. can you elaborate [indiscernible] the negotiatio
the quality of life, education and continued development of those affected by what is a spectrum disorders and we must continue -- affected by autism spectrum disorders and we must continue to support them. there are many experts, individuals and groups who can help us in this effort. i want to take this moment to thank all of you for being here. as the chairman said, there are so many people interested in this issue, so many who wanted to speak. but i want to say to you what i said bob wright of autism speech earlier today. i think you for caring about somebody other than your children and ourselves. because what you're doing here today is raising this issue so that other children, other than those that may be in your own family, maybe your friends, will benefit in the future. you're touching the future and you're making it possible for those who are going through the optimism -- the hottest inspector disorders to have a better future. so -- the autism spectrin disorders to have a better future. so i urge you to stay the course. one thing i have learned in 17 years is that, in order for t
. it calls for the end of the chronic inequalities in our education system. it promotes economic growth from free enterprise because nothing has done more to lift people everywhere out of poverty. of all people i have ever known, jack kemp did more to personify and personalize this message. every problem does not to support -- disappear from the workings of the free market alone. i would love to say if we just went on the gold standard, it would all be settled. [laughter] americans are compassionate people. there is a consensus in this country about our obligations to the most vulnerable. those obligations are beyond dispute. the real debate is how best we can meet them. it is whether they are better met by private groups or government, voluntary action or government action. the truth is, there has to be a balance between the two. government must ask for the common good while leaving private groups free to do the work only they can do. there is a vast middle ground between the government and the individual. our families and our neighborhoods. the groups we joined and the places of worship. t
that only the truly informed, the truly educated, can somehow know what direction this country should take. i often thought the reason why warren thought that is because in combat, like john and others and bob dole and danny, they served next to ordinary people with 8th grade and high school educations. for me, all of the things that have been said about warren i could repeat and it would emphasize what you already know about them. the reason why i martin so much is the reason i just stated -- the reason why i admired him so much is the reason i just stated. i never met a man in all of the time i have served with the single exception of daniel inouye who had the grit -- in ordinary americans. the thing i like best from warren is when he said, just tell them the truth. that is what he always did. he told the truth. we all have a slightly different perspective, his honesty could be searing, but his compassion was always profound. that is a rare combination for any man or woman. he believed that the coolest lives are often told in silence. he would come up to you and say, i was flat wrong. le
to a halt over hiring an assistant secretary for education. so my thoughts that i have had for some years. now it takes 60 senators to stop debate. the onus is on the majority. in the past they had to haul 92-year-old robert burns out of his hospital bed to come to the floor to provide that 60th vote. you want to continue to debate, you have to have 41 voters on the floor every time there's a motion to stop debate. that seems to me as a more effective way. because you could make it apply to all these over filibusters. host: a tweet says what happened to majority rules? the filibuster was to give everybody a say, not to rule the land. >> and a filibuster was a rarely-used phenomenon. up until the 1950's yoo might get one or two a year. now cloture chure motions, the one who stop debates aren't ones you talk about. host: democrats line, james, go ahead. caller: yes, good morning, c-span. thank you for taking my call. i understand the filibuster rules. i'm 63 years old, and i'm a disabled veteran of 10 years, vietnam. but nobody wants to get down to the plain, cut through the chase on the fi
we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national- security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. -- thanks robbie for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we
. that is also true for other highly educated federal workers. i wanted to make that point. the other thing is that one point that is not obvious all the time is that when a congressman or congresswoman come in -- comes in and leaves 15 or 20 years later being a much wealthier individual. can you address that, please? thanks very much for c-span. guest: i would echo that for c- span. that is tough. my role and out of act as a longtime observer of congress for the last 30 years. there's been a number of pieces of research that have been done in the last few years. most prominently was a cassette in 60 minutes" piece about members of congress stock trading -- was "60 minutes" piece about members of congress stock trading. i have to tell you -- i do not see it. members of congress by and large are hard-working people spending their time on what their constituents need and want. if they are trying to get rich in congress, they get caught and go to jail. we have high-profile examples of that happening in the last few years. some of the journalism, some of the stuff that has come out in the last
that work. but ultimately it is about providing greater opportunity, greater education, greater economics, the jobs and growth to a population so that they can have a real stake in their society and can be partners with their government. i assume part of your question is aimed at the whole legalization issue. i think this is an ongoing debate. we are formulating our own response to the votes of two of our states, as you know, and what that means for the federal system, the federal laws and law enforcement. i respect those in the region who believe strongly that that would end the problem. i am not convinced of that, just speaking personally. i think, when you have a ruthless and vicious people who have made money one way and are somehow blocked, they will figure out another way. they will do kidnapping. they will do extortion. there will suborn officials and takeover swaths of territory that they will govern and terrorize people in. so i don't think that is the answer. whether there is some movement that can be discussed, i think it will have to be a topic for the future for us. >> thank
would see places go down. we would see jobs come, we would see our kids educated better because we would have an invested understanding of it's about us being better, not about who's the weakest link, not about who's poor or rich, but about just making a -- that's it. host: this is bill in camden, illinois. independent line. caller: good morning, c-span. you know, it's really disastrous the way the government is handling. they want the taxes but they don't want to cut anything. and you can look at illinois and california as a prime example of what happens when you increase taxes and you don't cut spending. they should have a program where everybody under 50 on an entitlement program is trained for a certain occupation and once they're trained, if they're offered a job in that occupation and they turn it down, they lose their entight ltment, as long as it's not a real bad physical condition. the other thing is, we're creating generations of dependent people because we make it more enticing for them to stay on entitlements than to go out and find work. i mean, you can't make enough on mini
, gosh. i would lean towards jeb at this piont because he has really been pushing education. right now, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that are coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house was let's fix this problem by incorporating a small businesses and less government intervention to curb the deficit. it has been astronomical. then i heard barack obama say the way we are going to do it is by making more cuts in various ways. he was saying by
staff person to president of operation lifesaver, which has the important mission of educating the public on grade crossing safety. may god bless you and thank you so much for your service. of course. [applause] >> if gentleman will yield for just a second. again there's probably no higher tribute than to have the other side of the aisle lead with the praise of your service to the committee, to the congress, and to the country. mr. cummings and i know that you cannot be successful in our position without great staff. and certainly you have worked long and hard, 12 years for the committee, 25 years in congress. a quarter of a century of commitment to public service. i don't think there's anyone that deals with the rail or transit issues in the nation that doesn't know of joyce rose and her commitment to helping everyone. we hadn't passed a passenger rail re-authorization in 11 years. i was the ranking member and joyce worked with myself, mr. oberstar, and we had great cooperation from both sides of the aisle. we passed the legislation called priia, passenger rail investment. aut
for right now, and when to give our children the kind of education they need. i went to lead the world in research, technology, and clean energy. i want to put people back to work rebuilding our roads, bridges, and their schools. i want to do this by bringing down our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. [applause] >> on this last point, you probably heard a lot of talk in washington and in the media about the deadlines that we're facing on jobs and taxes and investments. this is not some run-of-the-mill debate. this isn't about which political party can come out on top in negotiations. we've got important decisions to make that are going to have a real impact on businesses and families all across the country. our ultimate goal, our long-term goal is to get our long-term deficit under control in a way that is balanced and is fair. that would be good for businesses, for our economy, for future generations. and i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we're going to have to raise a little more revenue. we'v
for religious sisters but it now educates a diverse group of students from around the world offering high quality educational opportunities that continue to reflect its catholic heritage. soon after its founding, laroche experienced financial difficulties that threatened the school's existence. due to the financial strain, the congregation at that time seriously considered permanently closing the college, however, because of the profound and positive impact this school has made on the community in such a short time, its donors at that time, the students, the state official, the community leaders urged the congregation and the school's leadership to continue the mission of the school and keep the school opened. thankfully due to the outpouring of support from the community, in 1970 the board amended its charter to establish laroche college as an independent co-educational catholic institution which it remains today. it also joined with the art institute of pittsburgh and diversified its course official, expanding the areas of study the college would offer, including graphic and interior de
centers of power somehow think that only the truly informed, the truly educated, can somehow know what direction this country should take. i often thought the reason why warren thought that is because in combat, like john and others and bob dole and danny, they served next to ordinary people with a grade educations and high school educations -- 8th grade dictations and high school educations. for me, all of the things that have been said about warren i could repeat and it would emphasize what you already know about them. the reason why i martin so much is the reason i just stated -- the reason why i admired him so much is the reason i just stated. i never met a man in all of the time i have served with the single exception of dan n.o.i. -- daniel who had the grit -- in ordinary americans. the thing i like best from warren is when he said, just tell them the truth. that is what he always did. he told the truth. we all have a slightly different perspective, his honesty could be searing, but his compassion was always profound. that is a rare combination for any man or woman. he believed t
. much like we want to have universal access to education. and we got to work hard every day to make certain of two things. one, it's good quality. and, two, it's affordable. and in fact i think it is fair for us to compare ourselves to other nations. we're talking primarily about the western industrialized nations where their delivery systems are much less expensive to deliver care and whereby the measures of things like infant mortality, obesity, other factors, diabetes, they have better outcomes than we do. so i think whatever it is you're delivering as a service, education or health care, we should always be self-critical to try to examine, are we doing it the right way, can we do it better, how can we make it work. but in the second thing, even if we say we don't want universal health care, somebody gets sick, most of the team they'll end up in a hospital and they'll get care. and the cost of that care is simply shifted onto everybody else who is paying insurance. like for instance if you have health care at work, about $1,100 of your premium goes to paying for uncompensated car
categories. access to education and the impediments i faced in my own life to education and how impossible it would have been for us to go to college if there weren't pell grants and student loans. it's the social realities and social changes that have occurred. you can't separate economic well-being from their social well-being. there are many young kids in america that are growing up in difficult circumstances raised by heroic parent, a grandmother in substandard housing, poor nutrition and schools that are failing. those kids are going to struggle. they don't go to after-school activities because the paints can't afford the fees. can you succeed? there are parents out there doing amazing things and will be the first ones to tell you, it is hard, but we can't be the country we need to be if we don't address that. government can have a role but civil society has a bigger role and we should support that and we have to address that and recognize it and talk about it. and maybe we haven't talked enough about that. i don't think that's the way to appeal to minority voters, that's the way to i
to be recruited for work across the country. his innovative approach to education led him to develop a block format curriculum that emphasizes a student-centered active learning environment, allowing students to participate in experiencal education from the very beginning of their studies and complete their doctor al degree in just three years instead of the traditional four. making roseman one of the most affordable pharmacy schools in the nation. during his tenure, dr. rosenburg helped transform roseman of a local school of 38 students to a regional institution with over 1,000 and offering an array of quality programs in nursing, dentistry and business administration. mr. heck: as he prepared for retirement, i commend dr. rosenburg for his vision, innovation and commitment to offering students an affordable, state-of-the-art education that has and will benefit the state of nevada and the nation. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from nevada yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >>
of the education committee, for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for three minutes. mr. roe: i thank the gentleman, the chairman, for yielding, and, mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 6582. this legislation would establish a uniform energy efficient descripter for all water heaters, walk-in freezers and walk-in coolers. the legislation also improves the testing methods that determine whether or not these products are energy efficient which will provide certainty for manufacturers and their products. in my hometown is one of the largest manufacturers who make up to 8,000 water heaters a day. and this is a real jobs issue in my hometown. these jobs have good retirement plans, health insurance and their competitors are both in canada and mexico and we need to do anything we can to help support these local manufacturers. this bill will make it easier for consumers to compare the energy efficiency of products and eliminate confusion that stems from having more than one type of label. the decision to invest in a large-scale appliance of this na
no leadership capable of making a deal. you cannot start with the education of little kids, teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for, and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. there are a lot of conditions for this to work. it cannot happen overnight. as i said, part of the problem is that have created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> express some realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. we'll be back essentially to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that? it is semi-democratic. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as to apply them, there will be certain -- circumstances were some send potential compromise is required, the new approach of these problems that way. if you have very good intelligence, you understand better what is going on within t
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned united state, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national- security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need t
contribution. >> let me ask you one specific question to educate myself as i report on this. your proposal you put forward, more revenue than the president, what about the actual trigger for some of the capping of those deductions, limiting those deductions? is it the $250,000 mark? >> we convert to an 18% credit rather than putting an overall cap on deductions, which governor romney had proposed in the campaign. and i tell you, the reason we did that, having considered it, and bill is one of the leading experts in the country on this question, if you limit deductions, it has a differential effect, particularly on charitable contributions, because for high income taxpayers, that cap on deductions will be eaten up by state and local income tax deductions and what you're doing is socking it to the charitable sector by putting a hard cap on deductions. we thought it was better to equalize the rate by going to a credit system. middle class and higher income people all get 18% deduction rather than a millionaire getting 35 cents on the dollar for a dollar of mortgage interest deduction versus a tea
. this process went on and on and did not progress at all. it was an education for people who were not steeped in the budget minutia the way senators were, but there was a real progress. we then went out to andrews and if anything the situation was worse. i have my access from the andrews summit, which i did not realize i had until they cleared out so they could put a new roof on because of sandy. they said, what are you saving the stuff for? i thought, this is what i am saving it for. my number is 108. i was not a lowest ranking person there. it was a room where food was consumed, but there was a whole lot of staffing and it went on and on until 2:00 at night sometimes. very little happened in the way of progress. until the much smaller group, the 8 people, largely without staff met in speaker foley's offices. there was an agreement reached which, as was pointed out, did not pass the hurdle but got halfway down the track and was a symbol of progress. that progress in part was the result of miss judgment on the part of some important players. i would say, senator byrd was convinced that the ca
the availability of the resources to solve that problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars to help us getting this word out to america. i think that is essential, because it's coming on very, very fast. there are things that are happening we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines and sailors and soldiers and their equipment overseas without any burden to our economy. not true. the truth of the matter is it's a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national security policy that defends the country that we love so much. so i think without having the ability and the willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this, and you're there to help us in giving the americans the answers to some of the very difficult and very cogent questions which they ask. i want to take this opportunity to thank robby for what he does . i met robby some years ago when he found my bottom office in an office building and came in, and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he's t
, and even though you can quickly get to it, it was a two-year process. of educating not only the public but the members involved. i would argue that the interest groups embedded in tax expenditures are even stronger today. it is not just about the guys who want to go sailing or play golf. they have tv ads running, grass-roots operations out there. >> but there is one thing else. in 1986, there were no cellphones. they had to find a wired telephone to call, and by the time they had done that, it was already passed. >> this is very hard to do. as bill outlined earlier, you can see where the groups are lining up. the easiest thing they can bring about is gridlock and doing nothing. i am a firm believer if we go back to the committee system we can actually do more in having these kinds of general discussions, because as will marshall said, it will take a blend of policies, some rate changes, some base broadening, but let's see what the traffic will bear, but the political environment, the culture on the hill will accommodate. >> dave camp and sander levin cut a deal? >> begin the process an
to education. we've got to work hard every day to make certain that it's good quality and that it's affordable. i think it is fair for us to compare ourselves to other nations. we are talking primarily about the western industrialized nations where their delivery systems are much less expensive to deliver care and whereby the measures of things like infant mortality, obesity, other factors, they have better outcomes than we do. whatever it is you are delivering as a service, education or health care, we should always try to examine are we doing it the right way and can we do it better. even if we say we don't want universal health care, if somebody gets sick, most of the time they end up in the hospital and they will get care. the cost of that care has simply shifted onto everyone else who is paying insurance. if you have health care at work, $1,100 of your premium goes to paying for uncompensated care, for people that short at the emergency room without coverage. host: on twitter -- guest: she's right in a way, because it's not a cliff. this is the design of speaker boehner and other republic
at this point because he has been really pushing education and education is one of my things. so right now he's got me. host: that's stephen, independent. who did you vote for in 2008? i mean in 2012. it's 2012 now. caller: i voted for president obama and i really, really liked mitt romney. i thought he had a great personality but you know, why do i got to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? so that really bugged me. host: stephen an independent in connecticut. tyrone is a republican in the bronx. caller: hi, how you doing. host: i'm good. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate for 2016, i think she handled the middle eastern issue, libya, to the best of her ability and also as far as the g.o.p. is concerned, inshe's made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house as far as step up to the plit, pleths fix this problem by incorporating small businesses and less government inte
to be buying, including social security, including medicare, including investment in education, including investment in infrastructure, including investment in innovation to grow our economy which in turn will help our deficit situation as the economy grows. without raising any taxes. but the fact of the matter is i know the gentleman has historically not felt tax cuts should be paid for either by reducing it or offsetting. the president doesn't agree with the $800 billion because he doesn't think the math works. i share the president's view. the math doesn't work. the most useful effort will be if we all agree on the onive -- objective, whether it's $4 trillion, whether it's 70% debt to g.d.p. ratio which most economists or a little less than that is sustainable or is on a sustainable path. if we all agree with the objective and then, mr. majority leader, simply make the math work to get there on a way that we could agree on, i think america would be advantaged, the economy would be advantaged and we'd see a renaissance of job creation in this country as we did in the 2000's. and i'll be
on their having education and training. they also know the relationship between the security of the seniors in their family and the prospects of their future. if there is not that economic security and their parents have to be looking after their grandparents, that limits the possibilities. they recognize that. they have told us that. when it comes to seniors, and we talk about how we're going to affect medicare and social security, that takes place in the context of what has happened, insecurity about staying in their homes, the review of pensions. issues that relate to the age of medicare. it is not just about what we do here. it is about what is happening in the economy and how vulnerable they are at this time. people are viewing what we have here as almost irrelevant unless it really addresses their concerns. these are the concerns of the middle class. one family at a time can strengthen or weaken those families. it is really important that we recognize the role that each piece of this -- what are the revenues? what are the investments? what cuts should be made? how did they contribute
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